Addiction Help

05-27-16_Addiction-helpContrary to popular belief, addiction is NOT a moral or character defect. In fact, it is a complex brain disease. It is a chronic disease characterized by craving, seeking, and use that can persist even in the face of extremely negative consequences. Alcohol/Drug-seeking may become compulsive in large part as a result of the effects of prolonged use on brain functioning and, thus, on behavior.

It is estimated that over 1.1 million or 1 in 10 Ohioans are addicted to alcohol and/or other drugs which in turn costs Ohio as much as $10 Billion in terms of lost work productivity, injuries on the job, hospitalization and primary health care, traffic accidents, court hearings, incarceration, cash assistance to adults too impaired to work or hold a job and removal of children from addicted caregivers.

Research shows that the success rates for addiction treatment are equal to the success rates for other chronic illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension and asthma. Approximately 40 – 60% of individuals who complete chemical dependency treatment and attend self help groups (such as Alcoholics Anonymous) are likely to remain abstinent from alcohol or other drugs.

Source: Ohio Association of County Behavioral Health Authorities, http://www.oacbha.org/faq.php, retrieved June 2014

Substance abuse assessments can be made at a qualified Stark County Mental Health & Addiction Recovery funded service provider.

StarkMHAR Care Network This local directory of qualified service providers, within the StarkMHAR Care Network, address mental health and addiction treatment. The directory includes a brief description of each provider’s services, programs and contact information. StarkMHAR Care Network »

Stark County’s Heroin Epidemic is on the rise with the devastating effects of prescription drug addiction leading to a resurgence of heroin addiction. The number of people seeking opiate treatment since 2006 has increased more than 200% countywide. Read more at Heroin Help »

Talking with Family Effective prevention starts with an honest conversation. Talk with your loved ones about substance abuse today. Find age-specific opiate talking points »

Detox Services Learn more about detox services available from the StarkMHAR Care Network. Contact Crisis Intervention and Recovery Center » by dialing the Crisis Hotline at 330-452-6000. Contact Quest Recovery & Prevention Services (Regional Center for Opiate Recovery) » by dialing 330-837-9411.

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FAQS

1. What Causes Addiction to Alcohol and Other Drugs?
Contrary to popular belief, addiction is NOT a moral or character defect. In fact, it is a complex brain disease. It is a chronic disease characterized by craving, seeking, and use that can persist even in the face of extremely negative consequences. Alcohol/Drug-seeking may become compulsive in large part as a result of the effects of prolonged use on brain functioning and, thus, on behavior. For many people, relapses are possible even after long periods of abstinence.

2. Is Addiction to Alcohol and Other Drugs More Prevalent In Certain Groups of Individuals? No, anyone may become addicted to alcohol and/or other drugs. Addictions affect people of all ages, all income groups, all ethnic groups, all religious groups, urban and rural, male and female. No one is immune to an addiction.

3. How Many Ohioans are Affected by Addiction?
It is estimated that over 1.1 million or 1 in 10 Ohioans are addicted to alcohol and/or other drugs.

4. How Much Does It Cost Ohio When Addiction Goes Untreated?
It has been estimated that every year addiction costs Ohio as much as $10 Billion in terms of lost work productivity, injuries on the job, hospitalization and primary health care, traffic accidents, court hearings, incarceration, cash assistance to adults too impaired to work or hold a job and removal of children from addicted caregivers.

5. What Is the Difference Between Addiction and Abuse?
Drug or alcohol addiction is a diagnosable disease characterized by several factors including a strong craving for drugs/alcohol, continued use despite harm or personal injury, the inability to limit drug use/drinking, physical illness when using stops, and the need to increase the amount used in order to feel the effects.Abuse is a pattern of drug use/drinking that result in harm to one’s health, interpersonal relationships or ability to work. Certain manifestations of abuse include failure to fulfill responsibilities at work, school or home; using/drinking in dangerous situations such as while driving; legal problems associated with drug/alcohol use, and continued use despite problems that are caused or worsened by drug use/drinking. Abuse can lead to addiction.

6. Is It Okay To Drink When Pregnant?
No, there is no safe level of alcohol use during pregnancy. Women who are pregnant or plan on becoming pregnant should refrain from drinking alcohol. Several conditions including Fetal Alcohol Syndrome have been linked to alcohol use during pregnancy. Women of child bearing age should also avoid binge drinking to reduce the risk of unintended pregnancy and potential exposure of a developing fetus to alcohol.

7. How Quickly Can I Become Addicted to a Drug?
There is no easy answer to this. If and how quickly you might become addicted to a drug depends on many factors including the biology of your body. All drugs are potentially harmful and may have life-threatening consequences associated with their abuse. There are also vast differences among individuals in sensitivity to various drugs. While one person may use a drug one or many times and suffer no ill effects, another person may be particularly vulnerable and overdose with first use. There is no way of knowing in advance how someone may react.

8. How Do I Know if I Have a Substance Abuse Problem?
Drugs/alcohol is a problem if it causes trouble in your relationships, in school, in social activities, or in how you think and feel. If you are concerned that either you or someone in your family might have a substance problem, consult your personal physician.

9. How Do I Know if Someone Else is Addicted to Alcohol/Drugs?
If a person is compulsively seeking and using alcohol/drugs despite negative consequences, such as loss of job, debt, physical problems brought on by drug abuse, or family problems, then he or she probably is addicted. Seek professional help to determine if this is the case and, if so, work to get that person into the appropriate treatment.

10. How Many People with Addiction Actually Seek Treatment?
Approximately 25% of individuals needing treatment will actually seek it. The widespread societal stigma attached to addiction is cited as the major reason why people do not seek treatment.

11. Does Treatment Really Work?
Yes, research shows that the success rates for addiction treatment are equal to the success rates for other chronic illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension and asthma. Approximately 40 – 60% of individuals who complete chemical dependency treatment and attend self help groups (such as Alcoholics Anonymous) are likely to remain abstinent from alcohol or other drugs.

Source: Ohio Association of County Behavioral Health Authorities, http://www.oacbha.org/faq.php, retrieved June 2014

 

Additional Resources

Opiate Prevention Toolkit » Find helpful information for Stark County students, educators and parents

Partnership for Drug Free Kids » Tips for parents and caregivers

Medicine Abuse Project » From Partnership at Drugfree.org, information for families and teens about prescription drug abuse

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) » NIDA is a federal organization focused on the science of drug abuse and addiction

NIDA for Teens » The science behind drug abuse

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) » Mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America’s communities

Start Talking » A State of Ohio initiative to encourage dialog in families, schools and communities to prevent drug abuse

Ohio Citizens Advocates for Addiction Recovery » Working to empower people in recovery, their family members, and other allies to become effective advocates for policies and services that support their sustained recovery and to reduce the stigma associated with addiction